Naming Our Abuse by Andrew Andrew Schmutzer, Daniel Gorski, and David Carlson

Male sexual abuse is increasingly in the news, yet most books and programs about healing are oriented toward female survivors of abuse. Andrew Schmutzer, Daniel Gorski, and David Carlson all experienced childhood abuse and address the healing process of male survivors in their new book, Naming Our Abuse. Using the metaphor of a car accident, Naming Our Abuse leads the survivor from the Wreck to the Accident Report to Rehabilitation to Driving Again. This four-step model illustrates that healing is a process to be nurtured rather than something that can be healed in a single telling.

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{More about Naming Our Abuse}

Naming Our Abuse: God’s Pathways to Healing for Male Sexual Abuse Survivors (Kregel, April 2016)

A stunningly vulnerable look at the horrific realities of sexual abuse and how to overcome them.

Male sexual abuse is increasingly in the news, from scandals in the Catholic Church to exploitations at Penn State. Yet books and programs about healing are still overwhelmingly oriented toward the female survivor of abuse. As men who experienced childhood abuse, the authors of this book are uniquely qualified to address the healing process of male survivors.

Using the metaphor of a car accident, Naming Our Abuse leads the survivor from the Wreck to the Accident Report to Rehabilitation to Driving Again. This four-step model illustrates that healing is a process to be nurtured rather than something that can be healed in a single telling. Following the authors’ examples, readers are invited to find solidarity with other male survivors and develop an understanding of their own wounding through journaling exercises.

Learn more and purchase a copy.

Schmutzer, Gorski & Carlson

{More About Schmutzer, Gorski & Carlson}

Andrew Schmutzer is a professor of biblical studies at Moody Bible Institute (Chicago) and a graduate of Dallas Seminary (ThM) and Trinity (PhD). He writes about integrative issues surrounding abuse, trauma, lament, and spiritual formation and speaks regularly on issues of sexual abuse. **||** Daniel Gorski is a thirty-year veteran software engineer, having worked for AT&T, Lucent Technologies, Alcatel-Lucent, and Nokia. He earned a BS in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Illinois and an MS in Computer Science from Kansas State University, specializing in expert systems and software automation. **||** David Carlson is a special education teacher, working in the suburbs of Chicago for the majority of his adult life. He takes great pride in being an advocate for his students and their families, helping them to navigate whatever challenges life may present. He is committed to encouraging and supporting male survivors through the various stages of their healing.

Find out more about Schmutzer, Gorski at https://www.facebook.com/andrew.schmutzer.

Press Kit

Click to download the Naming Our Abuse press kit.

Click to download a Q&A with Andrew.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Audra Jennings
Litfuse Publicity Group
audra {at} litfusegroup {dot} com
903-874-8363
@litfuse

The first step to healing is giving abuse a name

Three men share their stories of sexual abuse as an encouragement for others to share theirs

4/15/2016 || Seattle: From Penn State to the Catholic Church scandal, stories of sexual abuse are covered in the national media, but news reports do not reveal all the facts of how prevalent abuse is among males. “The standard statistic is that one in six boys is sexually abused before the age of 18 (1in6.org). However, Male Survivor recently reported one in four men has been sexually abused,” Andrew J. Schmutzer, co-author of Naming Our Abuse: God’s Pathways to Healing for Male Sexual Abuse Survivors (Kregel Publications/April 27, 2016/ISBN: 978-0825444005/$14.99), explains. “One thing to understand about these statistics is that they are largely based on self-reporting, so they have been historically hard to come by. As specialists know, men don’t readily talk about their abuse.”

Given the staggering statistics, why then does the church seem to be averse to addressing the issue? This was the question asked by Schmutzer and his co-authors, Daniel A. Gorski and David Carlson, as they began their own journey toward recovery from childhood sexual abuse in their church support group. They also found most of the books on bookstore shelves were written for women. In response, they joined together to tell their stories in Naming Our Abuse.

Having experienced the horror of sexual abuse themselves, the authors are uniquely qualified to address the healing process. Each one shares his story, modeling for men how telling — and writing — their stories can play a significant role in recovery. “Writing helps the brain process the significance of what happened, not just the fact that it happened,” Schmutzer explains. “Dignity is recaptured by remembering rightly, honestly and deeply. Writing honors pain by putting it in black and white.”

Using the easily relatable metaphor of a car accident, Naming Our Abuse leads the victim from their “Wreck,” to writing the “Accident Report,” on to “Rehabilitation” and ultimately “Driving Again.” The four-step model also illustrates for readers that healing is a process, rather than something that can be healed through a single counseling session, support group or some kind of spiritual experience.

Naming Our Abuse also appeals to men by requiring active engagement as opposed to passive reading. Readers are encouraged to go at their own pace, allowing themselves to identify with the fears, experiences, relational fallout and emotional pain that the authors share. After reading through each stage of recovery, the book prompts readers to reflect on their own experiences (journaling) and consider next steps (questions to answers and action points) and concludes by offering coping tips to help readers on their journey.

Learn more about Naming Our Abuse and its authors at www.kregel.com.

Advance Praise

“This book will be a great help to those who have suffered in secret not knowing if they can tell anyone their story or if they will be believed. Please read this book so you will better understand what many men are facing; and if you have been abused, you will be glad it has been put into your hands.” ~ Dr. Erwin W. Lutzer, senior pastor, The Moody Church, Chicago

“In Naming Our Abuse, these powerful stories bring us that much closer to shattering the silence and shame that has choked the lives of too many for too long.” ~ Boz Tchividjian, executive director, GRACE

About the Author

Andrew J. Schmutzer is Professor of Biblical Studies at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, IL. He holds a B.A. in Theology from Moody Bible Institute, a Th.M. in Old Testament from Dallas Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in Old Testament Studies from Trinity International University. Schmutzer’s writing includes numerous academic essays, articles and study note contributions to the New Living Translation Study Bible (Tyndale). He’s a member of Christian Counseling Professionals of Chicagoland, as well as an associate member of the Trauma & Transformation project to address sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. He serves as a consultant for www.1in6.org., an organization to help male victims of sexual abuse.

Schmutzer was born in South Africa and raised by missionary parents in Zululand and Swaziland. He and his wife, Ashley, are co-founders of a support group for sexual abuse survivors called CHAI (Courageous Healing of Abuse and Isolation). The couple has three children.

Daniel A. Gorski is a 30-year veteran software engineer who has worked for companies such as AT&T and Nokia. He earned a B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Illinois and a M.S. in Computer Science from Kansas State University, specializing in expert systems and software automation.

David Carlson is a special education teacher, working in the suburbs of Chicago for the majority of his adult life. He takes great pride in being an advocate for his students and their families, helping them to navigate whatever challenges life may present.

Suggested interview questions

—What brought the three of you together to write Naming Our Abuse?

—It seems we hear more about sexual abuse among girls and women than we do boys and men. Could you share some of the statistics regarding male sexual abuse?

—Why did you choose the metaphor of a car accident for the book’s outline and format? What are the four stages you walk readers through?

—How does a man recapture his dignity through telling his story of childhood sexual abuse (CSA)?

—You say writing down your stories “translated your trauma.” What did you mean by that? What are other benefits of writing therapy?

—How is Naming Our Abuse designed specifically to address the ways men recover from CSA?

—What are some of the stereotypes Christian men are often judged by that can make it difficult for them to be honest about their abuse?

—Sometimes when a family member is named as the abuser, the rest of the family’s first instinct is to defend the abuser rather than protect the abused. What should a family do when they learn abuse has occurred?

—What are some of the warning signs families should be aware of if abuse is happening within the home, at school or anywhere else?

—How can childhood abuse affect a person’s ability as an adult to assess and process incoming messages and situations properly?

—How can churches be more supportive of victims and aid in the recovery process?

—What are some things you should NEVER say to a victim of CSA?

—Why is forgiveness not the same as reconciliation? Do victims of CSA need to reconcile with their abusers?

—At the end of the book, you each wrote a letter to your younger self. What was the purpose behind that? 

To request a review copy of Naming Our Abuse, to schedule an interview with Andrew J. Schmutzer or for more information, please contact Audra Jennings, audra@litfusegroup.com.

Buzz

“This book will be a great help to those who have suffered in secret not knowing if they can tell anyone their story or if they will be believed. Please read this book so you will better understand what many men are facing; and if you have been abused, you will be glad it has been put into your hands.” —Dr. Erwin W. Lutzer, senior pastor, The Moody Church, Chicago

“In Naming Our Abuse, these powerful stories bring us that much closer to shattering the silence and shame that has choked the lives of too many for too long.” —Boz Tchividjian, executive director, GRACE

Reviews

  • ‘NAMING OUR ABUSE’ REVIEW

    I can tell this book is such a fantastic part of healing for men. I can imagine men who feel helpless, hopeless and alone, picking this book up and feeling like they know what steps to take to begin this process. What an awesome resource.

    Written by The Talbert Report on June 15, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/review/RKIDJBWVTCSSD/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm

  • ‘NAMING OUR ABUSE’

    This book was incredibly hard to read and it was heartbreaking to read about the abuse that happens and profoundly affects men for the rest of their lives. Deeply personal this book really addresses ways to find healing from abuse and find some rest. A lot of books focus on females and abuse, largely ignoring men who have been abused so this book is unique in that it focuses on men as sometimes their healing process looks a little different. This book is a very eye-opening and insightful read.

    Written by Perfect Beginnings on June 15, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/review/R3VUQTCGV04K2I/ref=pe_1098610_137716200_cm_rv_eml_rv0_rv

  • VALUABLE RESOURCES FOR SEXUAL ABUSE VICTIMS, BOTH MALE AND FEMALE

    With Naming Our Abuse, I felt I NEEDED to bring this book to light because the sexual abuse of males is rarely discussed. And well, it needs to be. This isn’t something that should be swept under the rug-especially in the church. And for the victims of such atrocity—they must be told that healing and hope is possible. Not by just anyone-but by someone who has been there.

    Written by Mama Bear Reads on June 14, 2016

  • MUCH-NEEDED AND HELPFUL RESOURCE

    Naming Our Abuse follows the stories of three men who are survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Through this short book you get a glimpse into each of their stories as they take the reader through 4 major transitions: the first part discusses the wreck of abuse, how the abuse happened and the context of its occurrence. The second part discusses the accident report of the abuse, namely the areas of life that were profoundly affected in the lives of the authors by the abuse that they suffered. The third part discusses rehabilitation, or the way that the authors sought healing and wholeness in their lives, and the struggles that they faced along the way. The fourth section is about driving again, or the vision of healing and wholeness that each author has.

    Written by Reflections: Inspiring people to be more on June 13, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/review/R2UG2AVJB3HK2K/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0825444004&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books

  • ‘NAMING OUR ABUSE’

    This is an excellent resource for those who have been abused or those who have a loved on that has been abused.

    Written by Inklings and Notions on June 13, 2016

  • A POWERFUL DUO OF BOOK THAT WILL BRING HEALING IN THE WAKE OF CHILDHOOD SEXUAL ABUSE — REVIEWED

    Childhood sexual abuse is far more common than anyone realizes. The statistics in these books make me shudder. I personally know victims of this type of abuse, and I am convinced it is one of the most insidious ways that the enemy has to enslave people to shame and guilt. This enslavement ends marriages, friendships and all types of family relations. This is an evil that even parents of the children being abused refuse to confront, and that lack of protection only further damages the child. This has to end, and everyone needs to know that hope and healing are possible!

    This is a unique and, unfortunately, a desperately needed resource for adults of all ages. These are books that are written by other who have survived and healed from abuse, and they gently bring readers to a place of hope where they can begin their own healing journey. The exercises and prayers found in the pages of these books will strengthen many. I am convinced these books are divine appointments for many! I’ve even suggested these as curriculum for small groups at my church!

    I am so encouraged that these books exist, and I know many will begin and complete their healing through the pages of these books.

    Written by Window To My World on June 13, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/?ie=UTF8&ref_=ya_your_reviews&sort_by=MostRecentReview

  • ‘NAMING OUR ABUSE’

    We don’t hear the story of men who have experienced sexual abuse and I think Andrew, Daniel and David write with vulnerability that you can’t help but want others to find healing in their journey. This is a fantastic resource.

    Written by Running Through The Storms on June 13, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/review/create-review/ref=cm_cr_dp_wrt_summary?ie=UTF8&asin=0825444004&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books#

  • FIVE LEARNINGS AND REALIZATIONS FROM THESE BOOKS ON SEXUAL ABUSE

    The triumvirate of Andrew Schmutzer, Daniel Gorski, and David Carlson wrote Naming Our Abuse. All three were abused. Yes, they’re males… this is why this book is rare because readers are given the opportunity to “meet” real men who are in the unique position to talk about male sexual abuse. Like Sutherland’s Journey to Heal, Naming Our Abuse talked about the importance of journaling exercises, of writing things down even going back to that particular point in time of the abusive act. It is painful to go back down memory lane because those scenes are not pretty but it is comforting to read about people who did it and came out victorious.

    Written by Reading Ruffolos on June 8, 2016
    Read my full review: https://www.amazon.com/review/R2GYV1L0XOOHFG/ref=pe_1098610_137716200_cm_rv_eml_rv0_rv

  • FREEDOM!

    I would recommend this awesome book to any male that has been abuse whether sexual, physically, mentally, or spiritually. I liked how this book was written by three men who shared details about what they went through with dealing with the horrible abuse. I especially loved how the authors also included questions throughout the book in order to assist people in finding their hope and healing again. I also liked how they had a little bit of room to write the answers. They talked about the difficult emotions of angry and even how guilt and feelings of suicide. I immensely liked how real the men was in trying to help others find healing and strength to continue on in their journey.

    Written by Andrew Smith’s Blog on June 8, 2016
    Read my full review: http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R3J1GOU9OUR5TQ/ref=cm_cr_getr_d_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0825444004

  • ‘NAMING OUR ABUSE’

    Naming Our Abuse is a book that is written to help someone deal with issues after being sexually abused. The authors separated the book into four parts. After each section there are questions for the reader to answer about their own abuse. Each author was a victim of sexual abuse and speak from experience on how to overcome the shame of being sexually abused. The reader learns that healing is a process and can’t come in one day. This book is geared more toward males that have been abused and through examples show how to move pass the pain and shame.

    Written by The Mary Book Reader on June 2, 2016
    Read my full review: http://www.amazon.com/Naming-Our-Abuse-Pathways-Survivors/dp/0825444004/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1464886014&sr=1-1&keywords=Naming+your+abuse